A different reforestation project is selected every month.

You can vote where more trees are needed by joining the poll, the most populair project will be supported next month.

Where should the trees be planted next month?

Learn more about the projects here:

Australia

Australia experienced one of the largest natural disasters in history. This year’s fire season has brought about unprecedented destruction as wildfires have spread across every Australian state, burning up nearly 6 million hectares (15 million acres) of bush as of January 2020. But the devastation witnessed in the state of New South Wales is nearly unfathomable – 3.6 million hectares (8.8 million acres) have been lost, over 1,500 homes destroyed or damaged, and 24 people have been killed. 

Ethiopia

This tree planting project links environmental restoration with income generation, providing the local community with the knowledge and tools to conserve their land, protect their water supply, and create a sustainable, diverse economy for future generations. It focuses on the Loka Bedelcha Kebele in Southern Ethiopia, and the Amhara region in the North. Both are areas where environmental degradation is threatening livelihoods and biodiversity. These regions face challenges like dry and unpredictable climates, poor soil fertility, ineffective land management practices, and lenient resource regulations.

Amazon Rainforest

Home to iconic species like the Jaguar, Macaw, Amazon River Dolphin, Black Spider Monkey, and Poison Dart Frog, the Amazon River Basin is a vast region with 1.9 billion acres of rainforest and over 1,100 tributaries — 17 of which are longer than 1,000 miles. With the world’s largest rainforest ecosystem, it spans 9 countries and is home to almost 30% of plant and animal species on Earth. And by holding an estimated 90-140 billion metric tons of carbon, its forests play a critical role in the fight against climate change. Unfortunately, due to logging, unsustainable agriculture, and forest fires, it’s also a high risk zone for deforestation and degradation. Planting trees in the Amazon Rainforest will help conserve habitat for its iconic wildlife species, provide sustainable livelihoods to local people, and stabilize the climate.

Kenya

Kenya’s Kijabe Forest is a highland mosaic ‘Afro-alpine’ forest that was once dominated by trees, such as the East African pencil-cedar and African olive. Roughly one-third of the original high-canopy forest still stands and provides important habitat for biodiversity. The forest is only about 5,000 hectares, but a community of almost 200,000 people depend on it for water, wood, and agriculture. Increasing pressure for land poses significant threats to the region, leading to the over-extraction of resources and illegal timber harvesting. Planting trees here will help protect this vital ecosystem, promote environmental education, and foster sustainable livelihoods through seed collection and ecotourism.

India

Ranging from the Indian Ocean to the Himalayas, from the Bay of Bengal to the Hindu Kush, India is a vast land full of contrasts. India’s forests are a reflection of the subcontinent’s great diversity of landscapes and ecosystems. Moist and dry tropical forests, temperate and subtropical montane forests, alpine forests and mangrove forests are all found here. Recognized as one of the 17 “megadiverse” countries, around 8% of the world’s flora and fauna is found in India, including species like Bengal Tigers. With nearly 3,000, India supports the largest population globally. Additionally, India’s forests support the livelihoods of almost 275 million people, who depend on them for food, fuelwood, fodder and other forest products.

Where should the trees be planted next month?